A mini-review of AFTER JEWEL

Today I hear from behind me a faint comment, “I liked your book very much.”

I turn, come back. “Oh you did.”

“Yes.” A smile.

As usual, I beg a review on Goodreads or Amazon.com.

Then I ask about one of my main characters – how the reader felt about her? Did she like her? My reader hesitates. She doesn’t say that she doesn’t like her, just that the character is rather — “angry maybe.”

Yes. Yes. That makes sense. She’s angry for various reasons, all of them legitimate.

Unsolicited Praise

I received an email from my mother, then from my father informing me that a professor at the college where my father worked for thirty-two years was “very complimentary” of my first novel, METAL MAN WALKING.

My father also informed me that this compliment was “unsolicited” and that this form of praise “is the very best kind.”

Yes.

Review of AFTER JEWEL

4.0 out of 5 stars After Jewel, A Tale of Two “Jewels.”, March 1, 2014
This review is from: After Jewel (Paperback)
After Jewel is the author’s fourth book. To be totally honest, it is my least favorite of the four. That being said, I still liked it, as it frequently reminded me of Grapes of Wrath. There is, in some of the chapters, a great portrayal of a simpler time. A time when children were required to be stronger; a time when automobiles were the exception, rather than the rule; a time when eight grades of school met in one classroom.As Jewel begins, it is apparent that something odd is going on. We find Jules under the house with her Grandpa, “Pop,” watching him fix some plumbing. Her Grandmother, Jewel, died when she was around eight months old (I believe). But even at the age of five years old, Jules (nickname for Julia Lynn), hears an odd voice inside her head; a voice that, at times, can be rather intrusive.As the story unfolds, we get a few chapters of Jewel’s (the grandmother) life, beginning with her childhood. It is in these portions of the book that I’m reminded of Grapes, especially when Jewel, her husband, and her son, decided to move to Texas for work during the depression. Then we get a few chapters of the life of Jules, always being distracted by this voice in her head.

I’m not sure how I’m supposed to feel, but I don’t like Jewel (the grandmother, not the book), at least the Jewel that is inside Jules’s head. She is selfish and demanding. Almost mean at times. I do like Jules (the granddaughter), and have to say that I was mildly disappointed at the ending, which I will not spoil here.

After Jewel is a good read, but, as I said earlier, not my favorite of this author’s work.