Sold a copy

This morning I sold a copy of AFTER JEWEL which was nice — gratifying.

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Another Re-Write of AFTER JEWEL

Just uploaded another re-write of AFTER JEWEL; awaiting proof. I’m excited this novel continues to grow — it appears to get better each time I tackle it. 

AFTER JEWEL is an important work for me in that it is based on my grandmother and on my family — loosely, to say the least. However, the emotion within the book is true.

I hope it will touch you as it touches me.

“Packs a terrific wallop” — A Mini-review of AFTER JEWEL and of the writer

From a fan via email:
 
“After a long hiatus I got back to After Jewel this evening.  I read Chapters 5, 6 and 7.  When I got to the end of 7 I was so deeply moved that I had to put your book aside.  I couldn’t see the pages anyway from the tears in my eyes.  Even now, writing this to you I have to blink them back.
 
All three of those chapters are deeply engaging… (Spoiler omitted)…
 
Your writing is, in many places, exceptional in its ability empathically to engage the reader.  Your dialogue–simple, descriptive, spare, honest–still packs a terrific wallop.”

Third Thursday

Sold one book yesterday evening at THIRD THURSDAY in Summerville. Met another author from out west who is writing a book on Alzheimer’s disease — a worthy undertaking — and sold GANI & SEAN to a man who likes to read.

Drank a little wine, a little beer, ate 2 grapes, a half of a chocolate covered strawberry, 3 corn chips, and a bite of Brie.

Although I hate selling, I had a pleasant 2 1/2 hours as I played carnival hawker to my novels — by the end, my voice was a tad raspy to say the least.

AFTER JEWEL read-through 6 months later

I published AFTER JEWEL on Christmas Day, 2013 — almost immediately made some corrections and re-published it a few days later — I’ve had very positive feedback from the few who’ve read the novel, but several comments about my main character have bothered me. I won’t tell — don’t worry. Spoilers drive me crazy.

However, I will say that I read through AFTER JEWEL Thursday night and Friday morning ( it’s a short book ) and I did get bogged down in one spot that a reader mentioned, but the feelings toward the main character elude me.

I would say more, but then my comments would indeed spoil the book for anyone who might pick it up for a quick, satisfying read.

I discovered the novel works for me, still.

A mini-review of AFTER JEWEL

Today I hear from behind me a faint comment, “I liked your book very much.”

I turn, come back. “Oh you did.”

“Yes.” A smile.

As usual, I beg a review on Goodreads or Amazon.com.

Then I ask about one of my main characters – how the reader felt about her? Did she like her? My reader hesitates. She doesn’t say that she doesn’t like her, just that the character is rather — “angry maybe.”

Yes. Yes. That makes sense. She’s angry for various reasons, all of them legitimate.

Review of AFTER JEWEL

4.0 out of 5 stars After Jewel, A Tale of Two “Jewels.”, March 1, 2014
This review is from: After Jewel (Paperback)
After Jewel is the author’s fourth book. To be totally honest, it is my least favorite of the four. That being said, I still liked it, as it frequently reminded me of Grapes of Wrath. There is, in some of the chapters, a great portrayal of a simpler time. A time when children were required to be stronger; a time when automobiles were the exception, rather than the rule; a time when eight grades of school met in one classroom.As Jewel begins, it is apparent that something odd is going on. We find Jules under the house with her Grandpa, “Pop,” watching him fix some plumbing. Her Grandmother, Jewel, died when she was around eight months old (I believe). But even at the age of five years old, Jules (nickname for Julia Lynn), hears an odd voice inside her head; a voice that, at times, can be rather intrusive.As the story unfolds, we get a few chapters of Jewel’s (the grandmother) life, beginning with her childhood. It is in these portions of the book that I’m reminded of Grapes, especially when Jewel, her husband, and her son, decided to move to Texas for work during the depression. Then we get a few chapters of the life of Jules, always being distracted by this voice in her head.

I’m not sure how I’m supposed to feel, but I don’t like Jewel (the grandmother, not the book), at least the Jewel that is inside Jules’s head. She is selfish and demanding. Almost mean at times. I do like Jules (the granddaughter), and have to say that I was mildly disappointed at the ending, which I will not spoil here.

After Jewel is a good read, but, as I said earlier, not my favorite of this author’s work.