Another 5 star review of my novel GASSED: a tale of the war to end all wars

Perhaps the most damning remark one could issue about a contemporary novel is to label it “old-fashioned.” However, in her new work, Gassed, a story about the fortunes of a WWI infantryman fighting for his life in the trenches, followed by an equally difficult struggle to heal upon being shipped home blinded and burned by Yellow Cross, Carley Eason Evans has given a startling vibrancy to the idea of being old-fashioned. Writing in the hullabaloo of 2017 she has managed to bring to life a distant era while simultaneously creating a story with the feel and cadence of a work that was composed in the earlier era by someone like Edith Wharton. War is hell, as we all are aware, and when shells are bursting all about them soldiers turn the air purple with curses that edit out none of the words forbidden in polite company. However, in novels like All Quiet on the Western Front such words do not appear. Indeed, it was Norman Mailer in The Naked and the Dead who pushed the boundaries by the then daring ploy of allowing his soldiers to say “fug” as a substitute for a word we all know very well. All too soon no word was taboo.

However, without any diminishment of the horrors of warfare Ms. Evans has placed us shoulder to shoulder with embattled men who utter nothing stronger than “Bloody hell!” as friends are smashed to bits by artillery and grenades. By using the “accepted language” of an earlier time I find she keeps us more deeply immersed in the story than if she had “modernized” the battle talk. Her work is as “old-fashioned” as that of Erich Maria Remarque.

With her hero assigned to a North Carolina sanatorium to heal his burned body and recover his sight, the second half of the book is a gentle, uplifting love story laced with all the expected restraint faced by all but the most sexually aggressive young Americans of that historical period. Immersed as we are in the libidinous sexual games played in contemporary TV and movie dramas, those seeking a bit of relief are sure to find comfort in the lovely, rhythmically paced romance that blossoms like a blood red rose between the wounded soldier and a lovely girl who is fighting to recover her own life from the “white plague.” Readers may well hear violins softly playing in the background as the lovers and their co-conspirators clear all obstacles that stand ready to thwart romance.

The novel also is graced with numbers of “flashback” scenes watching the lovers-to-be grow from childhood into full-blooded young Americans of the 1917 era where their individual stories marry beatifically.

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ADAM IMMORTAL

ADAM IMMORTAL is my 10th novel; my first science-fiction undertaking.

Here’s a recent review you may enjoy:

It is rare today to find a novel that lays out its tale in such efficient, succinct and uncluttered language. Offering a wide cast of engaging characters–several of them humanoid robots–Adam Immortal generates a narrative that clips along with unflagging pace and vigor as it imagines an entirely believable future world set in a 2056 mid-American hospital. At the outset the novel seems to be the story of Adam, an astoundingly adept robotic heart surgeon the hospital administration has purchased to control the spiraling costs of its advanced medical procedures. However, as event piles upon event, Mark, the human surgeon, colleague to Adam and narrator of the yarn moves ever more inevitably to the center as he wrestles with the ethical question: Have robots an inalienable right to develop and engage with the emotions felt by their human co-workers? Empathically engaged with Millie, his family’s robotic cook, housekeeper and child minder at one pole and Adam at the other, Mark seeks a viable answer to questions so daunting that they may not be answered short of a ruling by the Supreme Court. Author Carley Evans makes it abundantly clear that advances in robotic technology, which may free us from onerous tasks, also will impact what it means to be human. The conflict is skillfully laid out against the framework of her scientifically accurate and medically authentic description of a “brave new world.”

T.G.E.

My bathroom reading

I never understood why people read in the bathroom although I know they do. Recently, I’ve been grabbing my own novel, AS FROM A TALENTED ANIMAL and randomly reading parts of it while sitting on the toilet. Yes, very graphic — I know! I know!

What I’ve found is wherever I turn in the book, I enjoy it.

Biased? Probably. Yet, I have some distance from the work now and it’s comforting to know I like it, too.

“I Need Something to Read”

Five of my more favorite words strung together are: “I need something to read” but six of my most favorite words strung together — that follow closely after the first five words — are: “I want to read your book.”

These two phrases — uh, sentences — were “heard” by me via text yesterday, and this morning my friend — one of my readers — bought my novel GANI & SEAN.

I signed it to her, “You know I love you.”